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“The Lone Eagle, February 1934″ by Eugene M. Frandzen

Link - Posted by David on February 17, 2018 @ 10:21 pm in

Eugene M. Frandzen painted the covers of The Lone Eagle from its first issue in September 1933 until the June 1937 issue when Rudolph Belarski took over with the August issue of that year. At the start of the run, Frandzen painted covers of general air action much like his Sky Fighters covers. Here, for the February 1934, Frandzen has a British Bristol monoplane taking on a cornered German L.V.G.!

The Story of the Cover

THE planes pictured on this th_LE_3402month’s cover are the Bristol monoplane, one of the prettiest little jobs turned out by the famous British and Colonial Aeroplane Co. The German ship is an L.V.G. type C.V.

High above the ground, against a background of blue, these two planes have met. The German pilot was heading back into German territory when the prowling Bristol pilot hopped the German. The Bristol, only rating one gun, was outclassed in armament at the start of the scrap by the L.V.G. which had two guns in perfect working order; one Spandau up front and a Parabellum at the back pit.

For ten or fifteen minutes the two guns on the L.V.G. have kept the Bristol at bay, but the L.V.G. being the slower and bulkier of the two has been more or less driven into maneuvers by the Bristol. And after each maneuver the German has found himself closer to the Allied lines. Also he has been forced to allow his ship to lose considerable altitude.

Over No Man’s Land

They have passed over No Man’s Land with its writhing lines of battered trenches and shell-torn fields. The Allied pilot signals the German to land—gives him to understand that he will be given a safe passage to the ground. The reply from Fritz and his observer is an assorted spray of slugs.

“O.K.,” the Allied pilot yells. And slamming the gas into the hungry carburetor he starts to really do his stuff.

The Bristol slashes back and forth across the back of the L.V.G. like a fighting shepherd dog ripping the hide from a bulldog’s back. In and out of ring-sights— short bursts—few of them, but effective. The German observer shudders, claws at his chest and stiffens, then slumps against the ring of his pit, mortally wounded.

Little Chance of Escape

The German pilot knows now that his tail is unprotected; his chances of escape amount to very little. Still, that small chance is better than nothing. He kicks his ship around and blasts at his enemy, his Spandau hammering out sizzling slugs.

Far below, carefully hidden from keen-eyed Boche airmen, a battery of Yank anti-aircraft guns have been trained on the aerial combatants.

Suddenly the commanding officer sees the Bristol dive away from the spurting gun of the German plane.

“Fire!” barks the artillery officer.

The drone and roar of the fighting planes is drowned by the sharp bark of the “75s.”

The Bristol pilot coming out at the top of a loop sees two blossoms suddenly burst on either side of the L.V.G. He pours a steady stream of lead into the German plane.

An Exciting Moment

That is the spot in the fight pictured on the cover; just that one moment when the unlucky German is beautifully bracketed by a couple of archie bursts and is getting a broadside from the Allied Vickers gun. One second later the German raises his hands above his head. The Bristol closes in on his tail. The anti-aircraft guns cease firing.

“Just in time for lunch, Fritz,” chuckles the victor. He points toward a cleared space flanked by tent hangars far below. The German nods solemnly, shrugs his shoulders—and obeys orders.

The Story of The Cover
The Lone Eagle, February 1934 by Eugene M. Frandzen
(The Story of The Cover Page)

“The Lone Eagle, January 1934″ by Eugene M. Frandzen

Link - Posted by David on February 5, 2018 @ 6:00 am in

Eugene M. Frandzen painted the covers of The Lone Eagle from its first issue in September 1933 until the June 1937 issue when Rudolph Belarski took over with the August issue of that year. At the start of the run, Frandzen painted covers of general air action much like his Sky Fighters covers. Here, for the fourth issue from January 1934, Frandzen has a German Halberstadt smashing into the undercarriage of a French Breguet—with dire consequences.

The Story of the Cover

SMASH! A crackup in the air! th_LE_3401 That is the picture on this month’s cover.

A shaved second before the collision there were two trim ships battling each other high above the war-torn fields—two ships piloted by airmen intent on blasting each other into oblivion. Vickers, Lewis, and Spandau slugs have slashed back and forth across the heavens.

The big Breguet with its wing span of forty-seven feet is not as maneuverable as the small Halberstadt scout with a span of only twenty-eight feet. But the Breguet’s handicap is offset by its rear gunner, who has an office unequalled for visibility. On either side of his pit he has Cellon windows.

There is a hole in the floor that he can see through and fire through if necessary. Therefore the blind spot under his tail is not as vulnerable as in ordinary two-seaters.

A Dangerous Opponent

The small Halberstadt has had a taste of the observer’s fire when sneaking in from behind to make the hoped for kill. The ship the German pilot thought was an easy victim has turned out to be a dangerous opponent.

Twice the German pilot has barged in from in front. Each time a stream of Vickers’ slugs drenched his ship. One of those hot, whistling messengers of death has slashed into his shoulder. Not a fatal wound, but a painful one. A wound that causes his flying to become jerky and erratic.

Another Angle of Attack

Mad clear through from being bested in a sky duel with a lumbering two-seater the German pushes the nose of his ship down. He starts to slither out of the fight, then he suddenly changes his mind. There is one angle of attack he has not tried; that one is coming up under the blunt nose of the Breguet. Coming up with a brace of Spandaus churning out hot steel.

His Halberstadt shudders as he pulls it out of its dive into a loop. Up swings the nose. He presses his gun trips. A short stutter from one gun, then it jams.

The other gun is silent—its ammo exhausted. Then directly in front of his blazing eyes looms the undercarriage of the Breguet; six husky steel members holding the axle and wheels—the strongest under construction of any Allied two-seater. Too late the German yanks on the stick to pull out of danger.

And This Is What Happens

Smash—his prop chews into the tough steel struts. His top left wing snaps—rips off—his prop flies to pieces, as does the undercarriage of the Breguet.

Both ships will get to earth; but one will be a wingless fuselage holding a doomed German pilot. The Breguet, minus wheels, can come down under its own power, flatten out and take the ground on its chest. It will be a rough landing but it is a ten to one chance that those two Yanks will be in the air again in a few days. They will be on the job—looking for trouble and overconfident Boche pilots.

The Story of The Cover
The Lone Eagle, January 1934 by Eugene M. Frandzen
(The Story of The Cover Page)

An Ambrose Hooley Bibliography

Link - Posted by David on December 11, 2015 @ 6:00 am in

This month we’re celebrating the talents of that pulp stalwart—Joe Archibald. Archibald wrote hundreds of stories for the pulps, both dramatic and humorous. His bread and butter it would seem was the humorous tale. He had long running series in several pulp titles. In the detective titles there was Alvin Hinkey, the harness bull Hawkshaw, in 10 Story Detective; Scoops & Snooty, the Evening Star’s dizzy duo, in Ten Detective Aces; and the President of the Hawkeye Detective Agency himself—Willie Klump in Popular Detective. While in the aviation titles he had Elmer Hubbard and Pokey Cook in Sky Birds; the pride of Booneville—Phineas Pinkham in Flying Aces; and the one-two punch of Ambrose Hooley & Muley Spinks in The Lone Eagle, The American Eagle, Sky Fighters and War Birds!


Here the incomparable Dunc Coburn handles the illustration duties for
“They Had To Flee Paris” (April 1942, The American Eagle)

The Ambrose Hooley stories are written as if Muley Spinks were telling us the tale, describing Hooley as a sawed off little tomato who is a demon in a Spad and dynamite with his fists on the ground. Hooley is frequently working some angle at the 93 Pursuit Squadron and getting their C.O. Major Bertram Bagby’s Hackels up.

A listing of all Joe Archibald’s Ambrose Hooley & Muley Spinks tales.

title magazine date vol no
1936
A Fuel There Was War Birds aug 32 1
Hun and Dearie War Birds oct 32 2
1937
Doubling in Brass Hats Sky Fighters Jan 16 1
A Flyer in Cauliflowers Sky Fighters Jul 17 2
Jennies From Heaven The Lone Eagle oct 15 2
1938
Pfalz Teeth The Lone Eagle feb 16 1
Flying Fishy The Lone Eagle apr 16 2
Rumpler Stakes The Lone Eagle jun 16 3
Just Plane Nuts The Lone Eagle aug 17 1
Spandau Re Mi The Lone Eagle oct 17 2
1939
Goose Stepbrothers The Lone Eagle jun 18 3
Cockpit Cuckoos The Lone Eagle aug 19 1
Observation Bus Boys The Lone Eagle oct 19 2
1940
Filet of Solos The Lone Eagle jun 20 3
From Spad to Worse The Lone Eagle aug 21 1
Plane Jane The Lone Eagle oct 21 2
Chocks and Blondes The Lone Eagle dec 21 3
1941
Spook Spad The Lone Eagle feb 22 1
Reel Heroes The Lone Eagle apr 22 2
Flight Manager The Lone Eagle jun 22 3
Pastry Doughboys The American Eagle aug 23 1
1942
Dawn Patrol Wagon The American Eagle feb 24 1
They Had to Flee Paris The American Eagle apr 24 2
Prussian Patsies The American Eagle sum 24 3
A Bargain For Blois The American Eagle fal 25 1
1943
Sea Slick The American Eagle win 25 2
Francs and Sauerkraut American Eagles spr 25 3
Messup––1918 Sky Fighters Sep 29 3
1944
Cualiflower Alley Sky Fighters jan 30 2
Dough Dough Birds Sky Fighters sum 31 1
Uneasy Aces Sky Fighters fal 31 2
1945
Ambrose Hooley, C.O. Sky Fighters spr 32 1
Forever Ambrose Sky Fighters sum 32 2
1946
At ‘Em, Bums Sky Fighters sum 33 3
Errornautics Sky Fighters fal 34 1
Spy Crust Sky Fighters win 34 2
1948
Operation Hooley Sky Fighters win 35 3

 

We present as a bonus, Joe Archibald’s first tale of Ambrose Hooley. No Muley Spinks as yet, but all the other elements are there—the 93 Pursuit Squadron, Major Bagby and Ambrose shooting krauts out of the sky like ducks in a barrel while simultaneously working all the angles. The tale of assumed identity is illustrated by our old friend Frederick Blakeslee using a more cartoonish style! So, without further Adoo, “A Fuel There Was”—

He was washing out ships at fifteen thousand dollars a washout—but Ambrose was determined to win the war along with the heart of a girl in Kansas.

 

For Ambrose and Muley in action together, check out “Rumpler Stakes” previously posted on AgeofAces.net.

When this pair of wild aces get started, they ruin anybody’s old war!

A Phineas Pinkham Bibliography

Link - Posted by David on December 4, 2015 @ 6:00 am in

This month we’re celebrating the talents of that pulp stalwart—Joe Archibald. Archibald wrote hundreds of stories for the pulps, both dramatic and humorous. His bread and butter it would seem was the humorous tale. He had long running series in several pulp titles. In the detective titles there was Alvin Hinkey, the harness bull Hawkshaw, in 10 Story Detective; Scoops & Snooty, the Evening Star’s dizzy duo, in Ten Detective Aces; and the President of the Hawkeye Detective Agency himself—Willie Klump in Popular Detective. While in the aviation titles he had Elmer Hubbard and Pokey Cook in Sky Birds; the one-two punch of Ambrose Hooley & Muley Spinks in The Lone Eagle, The American Eagle, Sky Fighters and War Birds; and last, but by no means least, the pride of Booneville—Phineas Pinkham in Flying Aces!

Joe Archibald’s Phineas Pinkham was the longest continuously running aviation character in the pulps. Running in the pages of Flying Aces from November 1930 until the magazine dropped it’s Fiction section in November 1943. In 151 stories, Pinkham bedevils the men of the 9th Pursuit Squadron, all the Hauptmanns and vons the Boche send his way and his hapless C.O. Major Rufus Garrity with his pranks, jokes and insane inventions that seem only to amuse Phineas.

Here is a checklist of his adventures:

title magazine date vol no
1930
Sneeze That Off Flying Aces Nov 6 6
1931
The Hardware Ace Flying Aces Feb 6 9
Rock-A-Bye Jerry Flying Aces Jun 9 1
Bargains For Blois Flying Aces Jul 9 2
Tell It To The King Flying Aces Aug 9 3
For Dear Old G.H.Q. Flying Aces Sep 9 4
Crazy Like a Fox Flying Aces Oct 9 5
Junkers—C.O.D. Flying Aces Nov 9 6
Please Omit Flowers Flying Aces Dec 9 7
1932
Half-Shot at Chaumont Flying Aces Jan 9 8
A Flyer In Tin Flying Aces Feb 11 1
Too Good for Hanging Flying Aces Mar 11 2
From Spad to Worse Flying Aces Apr 11 3
Pride of the Pinkhams Flying Aces May 11 4
No Money, No Flyee Flying Aces Jun 12 1
Herr Tonic Flying Aces Jul 12 2
Sky A LA Mode Flying Aces Aug 12 3
The Reel Hero Flying Aces Sep 12 4
The Bat’s Whiskers Flying Aces Oct 13 1
Good To The First Drop Flying Aces Nov 13 2
Shower Kraut Flying Aces Dec 13 3
1933
The Bull Flight Flying Aces Jan 13 4
Sleuthing Syrup Flying Aces Feb 14 1
Nothing But The Tooth Flying Aces Mar 14 2
The Fryin’ Dutchman Flying Aces Apr 14 3
The Grim Reaper Flying Aces May 14 4
Spin Feathers Flying Aces Jul 15 1
Take The Heir Flying Aces Aug 15 2
Stage Flight Flying Aces Sep 15 3
Herr Net Flying Aces Oct 15 4
Bomb Voyage Flying Aces Nov 16 1
The Frying Suit Flying Aces Dec 16 2
1934
Smell-Shocked Flying Aces Jan 16 3
String ‘Em Back Alive Flying Aces Feb 16 4
Hans Up Flying Aces Mar 17 1
Hose De Combat Flying Aces May 17 2
No Fuelin’ Flying Aces Jun 17 3
Hunbugs Flying Aces Jul 17 4
Intelligence Pest Flying Aces Aug 18 1
Scrappy birthday Flying Aces Sep 18 2
Tattle Tailwinds Flying Aces Oct 18 3
Parlez Voodoo Flying Aces Nov 18 4
Good Haunting Flying Aces Dec 19 1
1935
An Itch In Time Flying Aces Jan 19 2
Crepe Hangers Flying Aces Feb 19 3
Horse Flyers Flying Aces Mar 19 4
Geese Monkeys Flying Aces Apr 20 1
Cinema bums Flying Aces May 20 2
Prop Eyes Flying Aces Jun 20 3
Rice and Shine Flying Aces Jul 20 4
Dog Flight Flying Aces Aug 21 1
Pfalz Teeth Flying Aces Sep 21 2
One Hun, One Hit, Three Errors Flying Aces Oct 21 3
Sea Gullible Flying Aces Nov 21 4
Fallen Archies Flying Aces Dec 22 1
1936
Spy Larking Flying Aces Jan 22 2
T.N.T. Party Flying Aces Feb 22 3
Doin’s In The Dunes Flying Aces Mar 22 4
The Batty Patrol Flying Aces Apr 23 1
Smells, Spells, And Shells Flying Aces May 23 2
Sky Finance Flying Aces Jun 23 3
Scratch-as-Scratch Can Flying Aces Jul 23 4
Blois, Blois, Blacksheep Flying Aces Aug 24 1
Fish and Gyps Flying Aces Sep 24 2
Watch Your Steppes Flying Aces Oct 24 3
C’est La Ear Flying Aces Nov 24 4
Scrappy Birthday Flying Aces Dec 25 1
1937
Flight Opera Flying Aces Jan 25 2
P.D.Q.—Boat Flying Aces Feb 25 3
Smoke Scream Flying Aces Mar 25 4
Poosh ‘Em Up, Pinkham Flying Aces Apr 26 1
Wrong About Face Flying Aces May 26 2
Bagger In Bagdad Flying Aces Jun 26 3
Spree With Lemon Flying Aces Jul 26 4
Swiss Wheeze Flying Aces Aug 27 1
Peck’s Spad Boys Flying Aces Sep 27 2
Scott Free-For-All Flying Aces Oct 27 3
Crash or Delivery Flying Aces Nov 27 4
Yankee Doodling Flying Aces Dec 28 1
1938
Flight Team Flight Flying Aces Jan 28 2
Cat’s Spad-Jamas Flying Aces Feb 28 3
Eclipse of The Hun Flying Aces Mar 28 4
Hoots and Headlights Flying Aces Apr 29 1
Kraut Fishing Flying Aces May 29 2
The Spider and The Flyer Flying Aces Jun 29 3
Zuyder Zee Zooming Flying Aces Jul 29 4
Tripe of Peace Flying Aces Aug 30 1
Cocarde Sharpers Flying Aces Sep 30 2
Heir-O-Bats Flying Aces Oct 30 3
Skyway Robbery Flying Aces Nov 30 4
Happy Hunning Ground Flying Aces Dec 31 1
1939
A Haunting We Will Go Flying Aces Jan 31 2
Don Patrol Flying Aces Feb 31 3
Kaiser Bilious Flying Aces Mar 31 4
Slaked Limeys Flying Aces Apr 32 1
Spin Money Flying Aces May 32 2
Flight Headed Flying Aces Jun 32 3
The Airy Ape Flying Aces Jul 32 4
Herr Dresser Flying Aces Aug 33 1
Duc Soup Flying Aces Sep 33 2
C’est La Goat Flying Aces Oct 33 3
Nippon Tuck Flying Aces Nov 33 4
Ye Ould Emerald Oil Flying Aces Dec 34 1
1940
Impropa Ganda Flying Aces Jan 34 2
Fright Leader Flying Aces Feb 34 3
Take It or Leafet Flying Aces Mar 34 4
Briny Deep Stuff Flying Aces Apr 35 1
Flight to the Finish Flying Aces May 35 2
Pharaoh and Warmer Flying Aces Jun 35 3
Dawn Parole Flying Aces Jul 35 4
Horse of Another Cocarde Flying Aces Aug 36 1
Air or Nautical Flying Aces Sep 36 2
The Foil Guy Flying Aces Oct 36 3
Bull Flight Flying Aces Nov 36 4
Leave La Frawnce Flying Aces Dec 37 1
1941
Crow de Guerre Flying Aces Jan 37 2
I Knew De Gaulle Flying Aces Feb 37 3
Daze In Dunkirk Flying Aces Mar 37 4
Zooming Zombies Flying Aces Apr 38 1
Dawn Petrol Flying Aces May 38 2
Jerry Prison Scamp Flying Aces Jun 38 3
The Eyes Have It Flying Aces Jul 38 4
Nieuport News Flying Aces Aug 39 1
Chuting Star Flying Aces Sep 39 2
Zoom Like It Hot Flying Aces Oct 39 3
Gleech of Promise Flying Aces Nov 39 4
Gas Me No Questions Flying Aces Dec 40 1
1942
Tanks For The Memory Flying Aces Jan 40 2
The Moor The Merrier Flying Aces Feb 40 3
Hot Francs Flying Aces Mar 40 4
Contact Bridge Flying Aces Apr 41 1
The Crate Impersonation Flying Aces May 41 2
Grim Ferry Tale Flying Aces Jun 41 3
Maltese Doublecross Flying Aces Jul 41 4
Spy and Ice Cream Flying Aces Aug 42 1
Air Screwball Flying Aces Sep 42 2
Glider Than Air Flying Aces Oct 42 3
Flight Headed Flying Aces Nov 42 4
Pot Luck Flying Aces Dec 43 1
1943
Heir Minded Flying Aces Jan 43 2
Chateau Theory Flying Aces Feb 43 3
Pinkham’s Pixies Flying Aces Mar 43 4
Laughing Gas Model Flying Aces Apr 44 1
Hide and Go Sheik Flying Aces May 44 2
Jappy Landing Flying Aces Jun 44 3
Three Aces Feast Flying Aces Jul 44 4
Italian Vamoose Flying Aces Aug 45 1
Czech Mates Flying Aces Sep 45 2
Gamboling With Goebbels Flying Aces Oct 45 3
Sounds Vichy Flying Aces Nov 45 4

 

“Haw-w-w-w-w!” As a bonus, here’s Phineas Pinkham mirthquake from 1934. From the February number of Flying Aces Phineas goes to some inventive extremes to get a captured flyer back in “String ‘Em Back Alive!”

Major Garrity had an idea. It involved sending Phineas Pinkham back to training school in his stolen Fokker to teach rookies to fight. Phineas had an idea, too. It involved taking that stolen Fokker across the lines to teach the Mad Butcher not to fight. Lay your bets, gentlemen!

Editor’s Note: This story was posted a number of years ago, but this is an update PDF with Archibald’s illustrations included to add to the merriment!