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“Blind Aces” by Ralph Oppenheim

Link - Posted by Bill on May 15, 2009 @ 6:03 pm in

Without each other they were helpless, together the Three Mosquitoes were the greatest destructive force in the air. When Kirby is accidentally blinded, Travis and Shorty fly him to meet the man who is the Allies’ greatest enemy—and in whose hands lay not only the fate of the German army, but also of Kirby’s eyes.

“Framed Wings” by Robert J. Hogan

Link - Posted by Bill on March 20, 2009 @ 4:57 pm in

This is the last Smoke Wade story that appeared in a Street and Smith pulp. In the August 1932 Battle Aces, Smoke Wade began his long run in the Popular Publication air pulps. Smoke Wade was a rough and tumble Arizona cowpoke, who left the range and became the skipper of the American 66th Pursuit Squadron in WWI France. Flying a Pinto colored Spad he called Jake, after his favorite Pinto ranch horse, Smoke always wore a six-shooter strapped to his leg and made frequent use of it during his aerial battles. He would often get in trouble with his superiors because of his penchant for placing bets on just about anything that seemed like a long-shot. But Smoke would most always win these bets, and everyone from generals to mechanics would be left owing him money.

“Aces in Dutch” by Robert J. Hogan

Link - Posted by Bill on February 27, 2009 @ 4:29 pm in

This is the third and last Smoke Wade story that appeared in Street and Smith’s “Air Trails”. Smoke Wade was a rough and tumble Arizona cowpoke, who left the range and became the skipper of the American 66th Pursuit Squadron in WWI France.
Flying a Pinto colored Spad he called Jake, after his favorite Pinto ranch horse, Smoke always wore a six-shooter strapped to his leg and made frequent use of it during his aerial battles. He would often get in trouble with his superiors because of his penchant for placing bets on just about anything that seemed like a long-shot. But Smoke would most always win these bets, and everyone from generals to mechanics would be left owing him money.

“Wager Flight” by Robert J. Hogan

Link - Posted by Bill on February 20, 2009 @ 4:33 pm in

In the August 1931 issue of Street and Smith’s “Air Trails”, Robert J. Hogan introduced us to a rough and tumble Arizona cowpoke named Smoke Wade, who left the range and became the skipper of the American 66th Pursuit Squadron in WWI France. Flying a Pinto colored Spad he called Jake, after his favorite Pinto ranch horse, Smoke always wore a six-shooter strapped to his leg and made frequent use of it during his aerial battles. He would often get in trouble with his superiors because of his penchant for placing bets on just about anything that seemed like a long-shot. But Smoke would most always win these bets, and everyone from generals to mechanics would be left owing him money.

“The Lost Aviator Contest” by William E. Barrett

Link - Posted by Bill on September 19, 2008 @ 2:54 pm in

This mail-in contest offered some great prizes to readers who could solve the two parts of the puzzle. The first part had the readers trying to find the flight path of a lost aviator. The second part featured a story by William E. Barrett in which the readers had to identify all the errors in the story.

“This Guy Weston” by O.B. Myers

Link - Posted by Bill on August 22, 2008 @ 2:36 pm in

O. B. Myers was a decorated WWI fighter pilot who turned to writing after the war. His air war stories have an authenticity that many writers can’t duplicate. This is especially true in this story of a new pilot experiencing the fear and confusion of combat for the first time.

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