Looking to buy? See our books on amazon.com Get Reading Now! Age of Aces Presents - free pulp PDFs

The Jailbird Flight—Resurrecting the Dead Man’s Drome

Link - Posted by David on September 7, 2015 @ 12:54 pm in

WHEN you’re collecting pulps after the fact rather than buying them off the newsstands you rarely acquire issues in their publication order. As such when you find a character or series, you don’t often read those stories in sequence. For some characters that is not essential, for other series you realize after reading two or three stories that you need to collect all the stories and then read them in order to appreciate the continuity that runs throughout the series. Such is the case with Donald Keyhoe’s Jailbird Flight.

I discovered Keyhoe and his Jailbird Flight stories in Dare-Devil Aces. Here was a band of convicts who chose to die flying suicide missions and fighting for their country—the very country that condemned them to life in prison—rather than rot in said prison. They were a rough and tumble bunch assembled by Colonel Rand from the bowels of Blois:

The Flight, at is core, is comprised of Bruce Kirby—Below the Rio Grande he had once been known as “The Killer,” now he flew through hell skies, leader of the strangest squadron that ever dared face death from flaming Spandaus; “Big” Durgin, the hugest Jailbird of all, a mountain of a man with pile-driver fists and a fierce, battered face that masked the gruff kindness beneath his hard exterior; “Tiger” Haight, whose dark eyes ever smoldered as at some hateful memory, perhaps of the day which had turned his hair to silver, though he was but thirty—no one knew his past—no questions were asked in the Jailbird Flight; Cartwright, the tall, urbane Englishman who looked like a British lord; the lanky Tinker with his drawling humor and comical, homely face; and last and by no means least—Kid Denison who reminded Kirby of his ill-fated young brother who had been brutally sacrificed by a drug-mad S.C.! All bore the notorious brand—the sign of the Jailbird Flight—a broad arrow burned on the back of their right hand—but they made it stand for courage!

Dare-Devil Aces was my entry into air war pulps—they were plentiful and relatively cheaply priced at the time (this is like 15 or 20 years ago we’re talking). Finding most issues was relatively easy save for a few—the January 1935 issue which has G-8 appearing in Hogan’s Red Falcon story that month; a couple of 1934 issues—February and July; and the first year of issues from 1932. Condition was not really a concern at the time—I just wanted to read the stories. The initial core of my collection was a lot of 17 issues that Editor Emeritus Bill Mann sold me at PulpCon one year for $100!

The Cyclone Patrol
THE OPENING SPREAD of “The Cyclone Patrol” by Frederick Blakeslee (February 1933, Dare-Devil Aces). This is not the original copy I had read, but an upgraded issue with the cover still attached. The previous owner, J.B., felt so strongly about this story that he printed his succinct review in the margin—”This story is NUTZ, , and so is KIRBY.”

Being familiar with Robert J. Hogan and G-8 and his Battle Aces, I initially read the Red Falcon stories in the issues. But my attention started to wander to the other stories in the wealth of issues as it does and that’s when I came upon the February 1932 issue and its lead story—”The Cyclone Patrol” by Donald E. Keyhoe. Frederick Blakeslee’s two page illustration for the story was shear pandemonium! At first glance, it appears to be two arrow emblazoned planes zooming down to strafe a bunch of armor-clad knights with rifles! Kooky. But as you study it more as you do—you start to notice that there are a bunch of much smaller figures running in fear and that Blakeslee’s perspective is not off and these knights are giants(!) and the smaller figures are normal-sized men! Reading the blurb at the bottom of the picture hooked me—

Pilots twelve feet tall—mammoth planes—rifles big as cannons—this was the squadron of giants, Bocheland’s newest sky horror. Armies fled in terror before them—until Killer Kirby took up their awful challenge, dared defy the strength of these super-aces with the gutty courage of his Jailbird Brood!

I had to read it! And I did—it was an electric story of a mad German Scientist, von Horde, who had appropriated another’s invention—the Q ray—to turn normal people into twelve foot tall giants which he planed on using to defeat the Allies once and for all. While trying to get into von Horde’s castle, Kirby comes across the Q-ray’s creator Kauben who wants to rescue his girl from von Horde’s clutches. They team up to break into his castle, smash the device, get the girl and put an end to von Horde’s mad schemes! It’s a great story—Kirby even comes upon one of his own Brood in von Horde’s dungeons that has been transformed into one of his giants—showing Kirby the enlarged scar on the back of his hand when he doesn’t believe it possible.

After finishing that story, I looked through my other issues to see if I had any more stories of this Jailbird Flight. At the time I had one other story—”The Red Lightning Ace”—as the blurb puts it: “For the Fourth time the Terror had struck What was this new War weapon—this terrible wheel of flame that roared out of the night skies to bring destruction—death—to all it touched? Grimly Kirby followed that fire sky trail, straight into the most hell-bent adventure he or his dare-devil Brood ever tackled.” More wacky WWI super-science action as only Keyhoe could write it!

In looking for The Jailbird Flight in indexes I found there were only two more stories in Dare-Devil Aces in issues I didn’t own at that time as well as one in the first issue of Battle Birds which would precede the four Dare-Devil Aces stories, and seven earlier tales in the even harder to find Battle Aces. A whole wealth of stories—12 in all—I just had to find them.

So I would haunt eBay and AbeBooks and similar places and do websearches and such and over the years I was able to get the other two stories in Dare-Devil Aces and the last two Battle Aces stories—for some reason, the later 1932 issues of Battle Aces seemed to be easier to find that the 1931 or earlier ’32’s.

When we started Age of Aces Books in 2007, I always had a goal of getting all the Jailbird stories so we could collect them into a book. As it turns out—two books. We discussed printing them out of order or maybe just the Dare-Devil Aces stories just to get them out there, but in the end we decided we should do them in order in two volumes. As it worked out, the story in the first issue of Battle Birds—”The Jailbird Patrol”—works as a great introduction to the series and so it and the four Dare-Devil Aces stories could be one book while the seven stories from Battle Aces of various lengths would be the first volume.

I was finally able to track down the first five Jailbird stories through eBay—the hardest to obtain being the March 1932 issue with a Red Baron cover! When I finally got the first Jailbird story from the September 1931 Battle Aces around Thanksgiving 2013 I read it with excitement! I wasn’t sure what to expect—if it would contain the oft mentioned incident that landed Kirby in Blois—the killing of his drug-addled S.C. who had sent his green-pilot of a younger brother on a suicide mission—or maybe the formation of the Brood—or would it just start already in existence. “The Jailbird Flight”—the first story—was a present. It contained everything! The first chapter is one of the best aviation tales I’ve read—there we meet Bruce Kirby coming back from patrol when he comes upon an obviously inexperience flight of Allied pilots being attacked by von Falke’s Hate Staffel! Amongst the besieged is Kirby’s own little brother! whom he see’s gunned down before his eyes! Crazed he returns to his base and confronts the S.C. only to find him hopped up on drugs unable to handle his job. Kirby offers him a fair chance to defend himself as he had done in his life before the war south of the Rio Grande.

    Killer Kirby stood like a statue, facing him. His hands hung at his sides, but the fingers were curled like talons. When he spoke his voice was strange and unnatural.
    “Better take that drink, Dorsey,” he said. “It’s the last drink you’ll get this side of hell.”
    An awful pallor crept into Dorsey’s face under the jaundiced skin.
    “What do you mean?” he whispered. His right hand crept toward the desk.
    “Jimmy—my brother.” A strange film came over Kirby’s eyes. The pupils had become mere pin points, black, menacing. “He’s dead, and it was you who killed him!”
Dorsey sank back before the look in Kirby’s face.
    “No, no,” he cried. “I swear to God I didn’t mean to do it! You can’t—”
    “Draw your gun!” rasped Kirby. “It’s there in your desk. Draw it—or I’ll burn you down!”
    “It’s murder!” Dorsey shrieked. “You’re mad—”
    “Murder! Yes, and you murdered him! Draw!”
    With a crazy scream, Dorsey jerked his pistol from the drawer. His hand threw the weapon upward. Instantly, Kirby’s hand flashed down. The gun seemed to leap into his clutching fingers. There was a crash as two shots came at once. Dorsey’s face turned a hideous gray as he staggered back. His gun fell from his hand. Suddenly he crumpled up and fell like a log.
    Startled voices sounded outside. Men burst into the squadron office. Kirby turned and faced them. He held out his pistol butt foremost, while a red stream trickled from his left arm.
    “Here’s my gun,” said Kirby slowly. His face was black as granite. “You needn’t call the surgeon. I shot him through the heart.”

Chapter two picks up as Kirby sits a dank cell in Blois awaiting eventual transfer to the Federal Prison at Leavenworth, Kansas to be imprisoned for the rest of his life. That is until Colonel Rand shows up and makes Kirby an offer—one he initially turns down until he hears their first mission will be a suicide flight against von Falke and his Hate Staffel!

And that’s just the beginning!

Our new book The Jailbird Flight: Dead Man’s Drome collects those seven hard to find stories from the pages of Popular Publication’s Battle Aces. As a Labour Day Special to whet your appetite, here are the first two chapters of the first story to get you hooked!

The Jailbird Flight: Dead Man’s Drome, like all Age of Aces Books, can be order from Adventure House, Mike Chomko Books, and, of course, Amazon!

Strange Staffels Now Available!

Link - Posted by David on August 24, 2015 @ 6:00 am in

Yes! The fourth in our series of themed stories of Donald E. Keyhoe’s Captain Philip Strange is now available! The book premiered at PulpFest this month, and although we had copies there, our printer informed us there was a problem with the files and one of the spreads needed to be tweeked and resubmitted.

This time around Captain Philp Strange faces off against seven of Germany’s Strangest Staffels! America’s enemies have assembled squadrons of flying furies, exploding skeletons, and invisible airplanes to turn the tide of the First World War. From the backalleys of Paris to the skies over Germany, Strange finds high-flying fortresses above the clouds, cursed aerodromes, strafing skulls, and other wild weapons of mass destruction!

Strange Staffels, like all Age of Aces Books, can be order from Adventure House, Mike Chomko Books, and, of course, Amazon!

“The Sky Raider Pt15″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 31, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. In the last installment . . .

    With Carmichael’s help, Dick manages to catch Perez, but the line-chief refuses to talk. In an effort to loosen his lips, Dick takes Perez up in his plane and puts it through every heart-stopping trick he can think of. In the end Perez begs to be put down saying he will talk. He admits to sabotaging Lawson’s gas-gauge, but will not name any of his co-conspirators. Dick does get Perez to sign a confession that he hopes will be enough to free Old Man Rand. Dick dashes off to Starkville with the confession…

Will Dick get there in time with Perez’s confession? Who helped Perez kill Lawson and steal the Federal Reserve money? Find out who really killed Lawson and masterminded the plan to steal the money in the final installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

“The Sky Raider Pt14″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 29, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. In the last installment . . .

    With Wilson’s help, Dick manages to make his night-time sky-writing device a reality. Trying it out on a run to Henshaw Field, Dick finds he needs to work out the releasing interval. The news of Dick’s success does little to lighten Mary’s heavy heart. She makes Dick promiss that he will somehow free her father before his execution.
    The wreck of Lawson’s plane is released from the locked hanger it’s been stored in and Dick finds evidence of sabotage while inspecting it—the gas-gauge was crimped with pliers to give a false reading. Asking Wilson who checked over Lawson’s plane before his fateful run, Dick finds out it was the line-chief Perez…

Was it really Perez who killed Lawson? Was he working alone? And can Dick get the bottom of all this before Old Man Rand faces death that night? Find out in the fourteenth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Wednesday for the exciting conclusion!

“The Sky Raider Pt13″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 26, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. On Wednesday . . .

    With all hopes exhausted, the trial of Old Man Rand gets under way. Old Man Rand’s innocence is little comfort when the jury returns with a guilty verdict and the judge sentences him to death. A distraught Mary exhausts all her financial resources in trying any and every lawyer in hopes of finding an appeal that might free her father. Dick, in trying to raise some money for Mary, discusses making his night-time sky-writing invention a reality with Wilson, a mechanic at Rand Field. Excitedly he tries to tell Mary about it, but her thoughts are miles away in a tiny cell with her father…

Can Dick get his invention working? And if he does, will it prove helpful? Find out in the thirteenth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Monday for the penultimate installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt12″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 24, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. On Monday . . .

    With some hesitation, Lois Hamilton provides an alibi for Tommy Rand, saying he was with her the night before the murder leaving late the next day. After some thought on the matter, Tommy realizes where his father was the morning in question and why he won’t tell anyone. Tommy believes his father was at von Siechner’s gambling establishment on the edge of town looking for him. Dick, Tommy and Mary head there. Von Siechner describes their father as having been there, but when he’s questioned by the police, he doesn’t recognize Old Man Rand!

Is there any hope for Old Man Rand? And what is the cruel fate that follows him? Find out in the twelfth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Friday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt11″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 22, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. The story so far . . .

    Dick Trent, novice in the Air Mail Service, incurs the displeasure of Carmichael, Superintendent of Rand Field, when he flies through the Rocky Mountains in a blinding snowstorm to bring back young Tommy Rand, who is stranded in a drinking in gambling haunt. Old Man Rand, owner of the field, beloved by his men, thanks Dick. Mary Rand, his beautiful daughter, is also greatful to Trent.
    The next day in a spectacular flight, Dick sweeps alongside Mary’s disabled machine in midair and saves her from a fatal crash. They express their Love and Dick is happily thinking of the future as Lawson, his buddy in the service, tells him he is leaving to marry a beautiful blonde. On his last flight Lawson’s plane goes missing. Dick, in searching the country, comes across the burned plane and Lawson’s dead body. A package containing $25O,OOO in government gold is missing. The only clue to the crime is a heavy Luger pistol used to club Lawson’s skull. Mary recognizes the pistol as her father’s.
    Old Man Rand, questioned, admitted giving the pistol to Lawson. He refuses, however, after talking tto his son, Tommy, who has been missing again, to account for his actions during the ealy morning hours when the crime was comitted. When the charred money bag is found in his own furnace Rand is arrested for murder. Dick, along with the other men of the service, is dejected. They all love the old man and know he is innocent. Mary, in hysterics, turns away from Dick, attributing her father’s arrest to the pistol he found.
    After his next run, Dick sets out to visit the old man in jail, but Rand insists he is willing to pay the penalty. Returning, Dick meets Mary, who asks his forgiveness. Dick takes her in his arms and the two vow to solve the murder mystery to clear her father.
    Suspicious of Carmichael, Field Superintendent, who knew of the gold shipment, Dick is later convinced of his innocence, when he intimates Lawson’s connivance. Dick recalls Lawson’s blonde fiancee. With her initials for a clue they learn she left for Hawaii. Jumping into a plane Mary and Dick come to greif in a field. Continuing by train they locate the girl, Dorothy Curtis, who angrily accuses Mary as the daughter of her fiancee’s murderer. Mary assures her of her father’s innocence. Asked to help solve the mystery the blonde mentions a mysterious man who talked of money and left a flask in Lawson’s room. It belonged to Tommy Rand. Accused by Mary he denies guilt of Lawson’s murder, giving Mrs Hamilton as his alibi. Mary calls her up…

Will Mrs. Hamilton give Tommy an alibi? How will this help Dick and Mary in their efforts to clear Old Man Rand? Find out in the eleventh installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Wednesday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt10″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 19, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. In Wednesday’s installment . . .

    Dick and Mary are looking for Lawson’s fiancee. With her initials for a clue they learn she left for Hawaii. Jumping into a plane, Mary and Dick come to greif in a field. Continuing by train they locate the girl, Dorothy Curtis, who angrily accuses Mary as the daughter of her fiance’s murderer!

Will Dorothy help Dick and Mary in the efforts to clear Old Man Rand? And what does Tommy have to say for himself and his missing time that fateful morning? Find out in the tenth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Monday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt9″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 17, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. In Monday’s installment . . .

    Dick and Mary have vowed to solve the murder mystery and clear her father. Suspecting Carmichael because he knew of the gold shipment, Dick and Mary are searching his house when he appears. He nonchalantly shows them they are on the wrong track, and convinces them he too is anxious to apprehend the guilty party. He mentions Lawson. Dick remembers the flyer’s blonde. . . .

Can Dick and Mary track down Lawson’s fiancee? If so, will she have any valuable information towards clearing Mary’s father? Find out in the ninth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Friday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt8″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 15, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. The story so far. . .

    Dick Trent, novice in the Air Mail Service, incurs the displeasure of Carmichael, Superintendent of Rand Field, when he flies through the Rocky Mountains in a blinding snowstorm to bring back young Tommy Rand, who is stranded in a drinking in gambling haunt. Old Man Rand, owner of the field, beloved by his men, thanks Dick. Mary Rand, his beautiful daughter, is also greatful to Trent.
    The next day in a spectacular flight, Dick sweeps alongside Mary’s disabled machine in midair and saves her from a fatal crash. They express their Love and Dick is happily thinking of the future as Lawson, his buddy in the service, tells him he is leaving to marry a beautiful blonde. On his last flight Lawson’s plane goes missing. Dick, in searching the country, comes across the burned plane and Lawson’s dead body. A package containing $250,000 in government gold is missing. The only clue to the crime is a heavy Luger pistol used to club Lawson’s skull. Mary recognizes the pistol as her father’s.
    Old Man Rand, questioned, admitted giving the pistol to Lawson. He refuses, however, after talking tto his son, Tommy, who has been missing again, to account for his actions during the ealy morning hours when the crime was comitted. When the charred money bag is found in his own furnace Rand is arrested for murder. Dick, along with the other men of the service, is dejected. They all love the old man and know he is innocent. Mary, in hysterics, turns away from Dick, attributing her father’s arrest to the pistol he found.
    After his next run, Dick sets out to visit the old man in jail, but Rand insists he is willing to pay the penalty. Returning, Dick meets Mary, who asks his forgiveness. Dick takes her in his arms and the two vow to solve the murder mystery to clear her father. . . .

What is Dick’s plan to solve the mystery of the air murder? Who will he question first? Find out in the eighth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Wednesday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt7″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 12, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. Things are looking bad for Old Man Rand . . .

    Old Man Rand refuses to account for his actions during the early morning hours when the crime was committed. When a charred money bag is found in his own furnace, Rand is arrested for the murder of Lawson and theft of the $250,000. Dick is dejected as are all the other men in the Air Mail service. They all love the old man and know he is innocent. Mary , in hysterics, turns away from Dick, attributing her father’s arrest to the pistol he found at the crime scene. . . .

Can Dick get Old Man Rand to open up to him and tell him about his whereabouts on the morning in question? And can he win Mary’s love back? Find out in the seventh installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Monday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt6″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 10, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. On Monday. . .

    A police Inspector arrives and arrests Old Man Rand for the murder of Lawson. No one is allowed to leave the house. Kiely, the postal inspector, arrives confident of Rand’s innocence, but Old Man Rand refuses to tell where he was during the early morning hours. Young Tommy Rand arrives. His father talks privately with him. Then the police come for the old man. . . .

Is Old Man Rand guilty of killing Lawson? What of the stolen $250,00? Will they turn up any incriminating evidence at Old Man Rand’s house? Find out in the sixth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Friday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt5″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 8, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened. The story so far. . .

    Dick Trent, young aviator, has just joined the Air Mail Service. On his first trip he carries an important letter from the owner of the field, Old Man Rand, to his son, Tommy. Through a blinding snowstorm he negotiates a narrow pass in the Rockies, locates young Rand drinking in a gambling resort and flies him back to his own field to save him from dismissal. The superintendent, Carmichael, warns Dick he has violated regulations, but Old Man Rand thanks him for the service.
    Dick falls in love with lovely Mary Rand and saves her from fatality by flying to her disabled plane in mid-air.
    Dick tells Lawson, a fellow aviator, of his invention for a skywriting signal code. Lawson informs Dick he is leaving the service to get married. On his last trip Lawson goes missing. Dick finds his plane burned and Lawson murdered. A package containing $250,000 is missing. Lawson’s skull is crushed in and after a careful search, Dick finds a clumsy Luger pistol.
    Returning to Rand Field he meets Carmichael nad Mary Rand. Thoroughly shaken by the discovery, Mary identifies the pistol as one her father carries! She asks Dick to drive home with her. On the way he tells her of his love and is happy when she sys she loves him. A moment later there is silence between them when she says her father has been away all morning. . . .

Where has Old Man Rand been all morning? And how did his gun come to be at the scene of the murder? Find out in the fifth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Wednesday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt4″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 5, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened so far. On Wednesday’s installment a lot went down…

    At the field, Dick tells Lawson of his night-time sky-writing invention. He sees Mary go up in her plane. In doing so she loses a landing wheel. Dick saves her life by flying straight for her in the air to prevent a fatal crash. Back on the ground, Lawson informs Dick he is leaving the service to get married. On his last trip Lawson goes missing. Dick finds his plane burned and Lawson laying on the ground murdered. A package containing $250,000 is missing!

What clues can Dick find to point towards Lawson’s murderer? And what has happened to the money? Find out in the fourth installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Monday for the next installment!

“The Sky Raider Pt3″ by Donald E. Keyhoe

Link - Posted by David on December 3, 2014 @ 12:00 pm in

Continuing with Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider, a serialized novel from 1929. A lot has happened so far and the plot’s about to thicken as murder is thrown into the mix! On Monday we saw…

    By a ruse, Dick Trent enters the Gambling house to find young Tommy Rand drinking and induces him to leave after reading the important letter his old man had entrusted Dick to deliver. The letter was a Government report of censure for intoxication. Dick, disobeying regulations, flies Tommy back to save him from dismissal. Carmichael see them land. He threatens Dick with dismissal. However, when he is called to Rand’s house, Dick hears praise for his work from Old Man Rand and finds he is in love with Mary. . . .

What could possibly go wrong when Mary comes down to the field to practice landing a plane? Find out in the third installment of Donald E. Keyhoe’s The Sky Raider!

or

And come back on Friday for the next installment!

« Previous PageNext Page »