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Featured Release


Our Latest Release

Captain Philip Strange: Strange Deaths

by Donald E. Keyhoe

Facing Strange Deaths! From his very first adventure, Captain Philip Strange has rooted out only the most bizarre battalions commissioned by Germany in the Great War. When flying coffins circle the air, or severed hands drop from the sky, the call goes out for the Phantom Ace of G-2 Intelligence. For the Allies know that only the so-called “Brain-Devil” and his aides can out-fly the zombie traitors and human bombs, or out-spy fiends like The Mask and the Man with the Iron Claw!


Roaring out of the 1930’s comes the greatest heroes to ever fly WWI Europe’s unfriendly skies!

Straight from the tattered pages of Popular Publication’s air war pulps, Age of Aces Books is proud to be able to bring you the best of these heroes. Don’t spend all that time and money tracking down dozens of the crumbling original magazines looking for your favorite aviator. Age of Aces has done that for you. Each of our books contain stories featuring a single exciting character or written by one of your favorite authors. We are also doing some books that are not air war but still have a connection to that era and those magazines. All Age of Aces books are 6 X 9 trade paperback editions, and are available from Amazon.com.


Latest Dispatches


“The Blackburn Shark” by Frederick Blakeslee

Link - Posted January 20, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

FREDERICK BLAKESLEE painted all the covers for the entire run of Dare-Devil Aces. And each of those covers had a story behind it. For the March 1937 Dare-Devil Aces, Mr. Blakeslee’s paints a tale of British planes catching a battleship docked in a small seaside town.
THE scene of this month’s cover is any place your [...]

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“Famous Sky Fighters, October 1936″ by Terry Gilkison

Link - Posted January 15, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

The October 1936 installment, from the pages of Sky Fighters, features Colonel Charles Kerwood, S.A. Andree, Rene Fonck, Major Christopher Draper and the first licensed woman pilot in the US, Harriet Quimby!

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Dare-Devil Aces, February 1937 by Frederick Blakeslee

Link - Posted January 6, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

This month’s cover is an example of what I mean. About seven types of planes are represented, and although some of them are slightly out of place, I don’t think you’ll mind. Let me tell you about them.

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“Famous Sky Fighters, September 1936″ by Terry Gilkison

Link - Posted January 1, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

The September 1936 installment, from the pages of Sky Fighters, features Captain John Blair, Lt. Paul Neibling, and French sky fighter Lt. M. Navarre!

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Painton’s Letters Home from WWI | 24 January 1919

Link - Posted December 30, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

“As Coblentz has been made the headquarters of the 3rd Army and everything of importance centers here, it would not go amiss to give a brief description. Coblentz, with Treves or Trier as the Germans call it, rate as two of the oldest cities in Germany, dating back to the time of Caesar….

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“McClarnin Shoots a Natural” by Allan R. Bosworth

Link - Posted December 27, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

Stealthily the four men entered that water-tight storeroom and dogged down the door. Yet they soon found a fifth one among them, grimly smiling at their little game.

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Painton’s Letters Home from WWI | 3 January 1919

Link - Posted December 26, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

THIS month we’re featuring Frederick C. Painton’s letters he wrote home while serving with the American Expeditionary Forces in WWI. Portions of these letters were published in his hometown paper, The Elmira Star-Gazette of Elmira, New York. Before the war young Fred Painton had been doing various jobs at the Elmira Advertiser as [...]

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Painton’s Letters Home from WWI | 24 December 1918

Link - Posted December 24, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

Luxemburg is no place to sojourn on a private soldier’s salary, unless the latter carries his own canteen along with him. One day’s meals cost about twelve dollars….

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“How Barker Won the V.C.” by Paul J. Bissell

Link - Posted December 23, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

JUST four years before, it had been Barker. W.G. Private 106074, First Canadian Rifles. Today, October 17, 1918, it was Major Barker, D.S.C., M.C., with forty-six Germans to his credit, who was waving good-bye to his squadron mates as in his Snipe machine he took off for England…

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Painton’s Letters Home from WWI | 30 November 1918

Link - Posted December 18, 2019 @ 6:00 am in

His description of the celebration in Paris, written the day after the armistice was signed, follows…

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