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Featured Release


Our Latest Release

Captain Philip Strange: Strange Deaths

by Donald E. Keyhoe

Facing Strange Deaths! From his very first adventure, Captain Philip Strange has rooted out only the most bizarre battalions commissioned by Germany in the Great War. When flying coffins circle the air, or severed hands drop from the sky, the call goes out for the Phantom Ace of G-2 Intelligence. For the Allies know that only the so-called “Brain-Devil” and his aides can out-fly the zombie traitors and human bombs, or out-spy fiends like The Mask and the Man with the Iron Claw!


Roaring out of the 1930’s comes the greatest heroes to ever fly WWI Europe’s unfriendly skies!

Straight from the tattered pages of Popular Publication’s air war pulps, Age of Aces Books is proud to be able to bring you the best of these heroes. Don’t spend all that time and money tracking down dozens of the crumbling original magazines looking for your favorite aviator. Age of Aces has done that for you. Each of our books contain stories featuring a single exciting character or written by one of your favorite authors. We are also doing some books that are not air war but still have a connection to that era and those magazines. All Age of Aces books are 6 X 9 trade paperback editions, and are available from Amazon.com.


Latest Dispatches


“Sky Writers, August 1936″ by Terry Gilkison

Link - Posted September 23, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

Test your war-air knowledge and try your hand at this month’s quiz!

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F.E. Rechnitzer’s “Three Tough Days”

Link - Posted September 18, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

The Courier-News, Bridgewater, NJ, Friday, 15 November 1918, page 11.
F.E. RECHNITZER tells of his harrowing encounter with a Boche prison camp after his plane was forced to land on the wrong side of the lines. A prisoner of the Germans, this war aviator was given a strange third degree—and made the victim of a Boche [...]

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The Lone Eagle, December 1938 by Eugene M. Frandzen

Link - Posted September 14, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

For the December 1938 issue, Frandzen gives us a throwback cover with the Pfalz D3 vs the Nieuport 17!

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“The Singing Major” by Raoul Whitfield

Link - Posted September 11, 2020 @ 9:28 pm in

He looked mild, but he was rough, tough and nasty—that Singing Major, Up and down the Front he was famous for anything from arson to mayhem until he answered his third curtain call and found the Reaper himself blocking the wings.

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“Little Orphan Danny” by Allan R. Bosworth

Link - Posted @ 6:00 am in

Dizzy Donovan, premier poet of the air, took an orphan to raise. When the pilots of the Steenth tried to celebrate Little Danny’s birthday they learned about the war from him!

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“Famous Sky Fighters, November 1937″ by Terry Gilkison

Link - Posted September 9, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

The November 1937 installment, from the pages of Sky Fighters, features Captain Donald MacLaren, Captain W.D. “Bill” Williams, Roland Garros and Anthony Fokker!

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“The Black Bat” by Syl MacDowell

Link - Posted September 4, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

Behind the curtain of night Weird wings hovered over the Yank tarmac. A ship crashed with no hand at the stick. . . . And the priceless eye of the army was missing.

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“Crash on Delivery” by Joe Archibald

Link - Posted August 28, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

“Gimme this an’ gimme that!” Yes, it seemed that everybody in the sector had the “gimme’s.” Jacques le Bouillon wanted marks, a slew of tough doughs wanted francs, Hauptmann von Katzenjammer wanted his pay, and Colonel McWhinney wanted satisfaction. Outside of that, everything was peaceful—except that the M.P.’s wanted Phineas!

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“Sky Writers, March 1936″ by Terry Gilkison

Link - Posted August 26, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

Test your war-air knowledge and try your hand at this month’s quiz!

[Read More]



“Sea Bats” by Lester Dent

Link - Posted August 21, 2020 @ 6:00 am in

A flying ship without a pilot; a murder without a murderer; a base without a hangar—Squeak knew something was haywire. It took double-crossed wings to throw the shadow of black crosses where they belonged.

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